Apple Configurator Fundamentals Part 2

In this issue we connect our devices and prepare them for distribution. The process of preparing devices takes time at first. There is a lot to learn. There is a process to managing devices with Apple Configurator. Frustration creeps in if you don’t understand the process and how Apple Configurator works.

Profiles and Blueprints are powerful tools in Apple Configurator. They greatly increase what we can do to manage devices. They can also cause some frustration. The profile we created in the last issue prevents the installation of apps by users of the device. This option also prevents the installation of Apps with Apple Configurator. Teachers don't always understand how this works. So I will review this step in the configuration.

Apple Configurator Fundamentals Part 1

Apple Configurator is an application used to set up and configure iOS devices. It is typically used to set up iPads. Apple Configurator works best when configuring and managing devices in small organizations. I have used and trained others to use Apple Configurator. We use it to configure, assign, and manage devices at the classroom and campus level. It is much better to use a cloud management service for large sets of devices. These are Mobile Device Management services.

Bar Charts with Google Sheets

Bar Graphs represent data visually as a series of bars. They are often presented to students in formative assessments. Teachers rarely take the time to create graphs from data for assessments or lessons. I didn’t use them at first either. Creating graphs is time consuming. I needed to do something because my students often missed easy problems when it came to questions from a graph or table. I was often surprised because we covered them during practice for the larger state assessments. It wasn’t until they started to develop their own that they began to make the crucial connections.

Google Forms Assessment Fundamentals

These are the four question types that work best when creating assessments. There are a variety of ways to use the questions for formative and summative assessments. One assessment is useful as an introduction to a lesson. It allows us to evaluate what students know. The same assessment can be used at the end of the lesson to assess what the students have learned. This helps determine gaps in their understanding.

TinkerCAD Circuits

This issue reviews the assembly of a basic circuit with an LED and push button. We compare the use of a push button and a switch in the same circuit. The lesson emphasizes how closed circuits work and the flow of current through a circuit. The circuit uses a resistor to limit the amount of current flowing through the LED. The resistor demonstrates how we limit the flow of current through a circuit. Students understand that current is something that flows through a circuit event if we can’t see it flowing. There is an animation below that shows how current flows through our basic LED circuit. I used an app to create the circuit simulator.

Microsoft Sway Fundamentals

The integration of technology requires a connection to pedagogy. In this issue, we take a look at the fundamentals of Microsoft Sway. We take on a basic project where students integrate a small research project. This fundamentals lesson is designed to be an introduction for both teachers and students. I follow the tried and true method of I do, We do, then You do.

Google Sheets Response Cleaning

In this issue, we will look at the collected information. We took steps to validate the information on the form. The validation didn’t include spell checking or formatting. Some of the formatting issues we encounter include capitalization, unwanted spaces, and misspellings. This information needs to be reviewed before it appears in the presentation schedule. This corrected information is sent to the presenters for verification.

Google Forms Validation

This is the first issue in a five-part series. The series covers various tools I use to gather information for a conference held by my district. The tools have changed over time. The tools I use now revolve around the Google environment. I use Google Forms to collect presenter, participant, and vendor information. I use Google Sheets to organize the conference schedule. I use Sheets to create and printing conference badges. Sheets is also used to develop the online conference schedule.

Google Sheet Pivot Table

Google Sheets and pivot tables are a good way to help students make sense of data. We will learn how to use use a pivot table to organize the information in the data sheet. This pivot table will help answer some questions we have about volcanoes. Use the questions in this article as part of your lesson. Start by asking students these questions before looking at the data. This starts the questioning and thinking process in their minds.

Google Slides for Interactive Stories

There are many similarities between Google Slides, PowerPoint, and Keynote. There are several advanced features in PowerPoint and Keynote that are not yet available in Google Slides. One feature that is available in Google Slides, which is also available in PowerPoint and Keynote, makes it a good application for creating interactive slides and stories. This feature allows us to create links to slides. We will use this feature to develop parts of our interactive story.

I will be taking a different spin on the tale of the "Three Little Pigs". The focus is not on the story but on the skills. What you learn here can be applied to other interactive presentations. Interactive slides can be used with research topics in content areas like science, math, history, and social studies.